Make your own free website on Tripod.com

HISTORY OF THE SCHIPPERKE IN CANADA

EPILEPSY RESEARCH - BREAKING NEWS
WHAT IS A SCHIPPERKE
2009 Specialty Results
2007 SPECIALTY -History in the making
NEWSLETTERS
EPILEPSY RESEARCH - BREAKING NEWS
RESCUE SCHIPS AVAILALBE FOR ADOPTION
1888 STANDARD
YOU BE THE JUDGE - Robert Cole
ABOUT THE SCC
ILLUSTRATED STANDARD
LIVING WITH A SCHIPPERKE
HISTORY & ORIGINS - new links added!
HEALTH INFORMATION- new update
SCC MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION
SPECIALTY INFORMATION - WINNERS AND RESULTS
SCHIPPERKE CLUB OF AMERICA
FAMOUS CANADIAN BRED SCHIPPERKES
FAMOUS CDN BRED SCHIPS 2
FAMOUS CDN BRED SCHIPS 3
BREEDER LISTINGS
AGILITY Dogs
MAJEKIN SCHIPPERKES
Diana Kinnear candidate
Junior Handling
2011 SCC specialty
FAVOURITE LINKS
RESCUES AVAILABLE - check here
CONTACT US

Schipperkes are to be included in the research to map the gene for epilepsy!
 
If your schip or any relatives have ever had a seizure please send a sample of blood for the study
 
You can find all the information here
 
 
The forms and instructions are on the website.  This is one of the most important studies being done for our breed .
 
Please participate.
 
The Schipperke thanks you
 
Here is some information about this research
 
 

Canine Epilepsy Research

Ned Patterson, DVM
University of Minnesota, College of Veterinary Medicine

Gary Johnson, DVM, PhD
University of Missouri, College of Veterinary Medicine

The Canine Epilepsy Project is a collaborative study into the causes of epilepsy in dogs. It is supported by grants from the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), National Institutes of Health (NIH), individual breed clubs and private donations. Grants supporting this research are CHF Completed Grant #1718, CHF Completed Grant #1729, CHF Completed Grant #1845, CHF Active Grant #2252, CHF Active Grant #2304, and NIH Award #1K08NS0224501.

Our goal is to find the genes responsible for epilepsy in dogs so that wise breeding can decrease the incidence of the disease in dogs. We also hope that knowing what genes regulate epilepsy in dogs may help us better tailor our therapy to the specific cause.

The objectives of our investigations into hereditary canine epilepsy are:

  1. Recruit samples from a large number of affected individuals and their immediate family members (siblings, parents, and grandparents), from many breeds of dogs.
  2. Evaluate the genotype of selected families to search for linkage between DNA markers and clinical epilepsy, then use this information to identify the causative mutation or mutations.
  3. Devise a DNA marker test that detects and distinguishes normal and mutant (epilepsy-causing) alleles, and make this test available to dog breeders so that they can produce epilepsy-free dogs.